The East and the West Has Different Leadership Concepts
06/05/04    Wang Li    CDJP    存库之前的阅读次数:304
The East and the West Has Different Leadership Concepts

The East and the West has different leadership concepts, although most thoughts are same or similar. But if you study carefully, you may find that it is just the slight difference makes the difference between the Western democracy and the Eastern Autocracy, and it is all because of the state of mind of the people.

 

When this June 4th, so many media commentaries and dissidents are putting their hope on CCP highest leadership Hu Jintao – Wen Jiabao, or the reformists within the CCP, lets see what the Western leaders and philosophers have said.

 

Don’t be sad to read this: Every nation has the government that it deserves by Joseph De Maistre, letter to X, Aug. 15, 1811. China has to change its government. Chinese people have to change its culture. This is a question of changing the sate of mind of the people. We may have a lot to do, for generations.

 

The following are some quotations.

 

  • He who is to be a good ruler must first have been ruled. (Aristotle)
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  • It is a miserable state of mind to have few things to desire, and many things to fear; and yet that commonly is the case of kings. (Ibid)
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  • The people’s leaders have taken the wrong turning, and those who are led are lost. (Bible, Isaiah 9:16)
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  • Put not your trust in princes. (Bible, Psalms 146:3)
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  • I had rather be right than be president. (Henry Clay, speech, U.S. Senate, 1850)
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  • I have to be seen to be Believed. (Elizabeth II)
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  • To be a leader of men on must turn one’s back on men. (Havelock Ellis)
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  • The art of leadership … consists in consolidating the attention of the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will split up that attention. (Adolf Hitler)
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  • A president’s hardest task is not to do what is right but to know what is right. (Lyndon B. Johnson.)
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  • Caesar’s wife must be above suspicion. (Julius Caesar)
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  • A leader is best
  • When people hardly know that he exists.
  • Not so good when people obey and acclaim him.
  • Worst when they despise him. (Lao-Tzu)
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  • I am their [The people’s] chief; I must follow them. (Alexander Auguste Ledru-Rollin)
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  • Nobility [or, rank] has its obligations. (Duc De Levis)
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  • On the highest throne in the world, we still ist only on our own rumps. (Montaigne)
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  • A leader is a dealer in home. (Napoleon)
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  • It is impossible to reign innocently. (Lous De Saint-Just)
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  • Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. (Shakespeare)
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  • In every society some men are born to rule, and some to advise. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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  • A government that is big enough to give you all you want is big enough to take it all away. (Barry Goldwater)
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  • The less government we have, the better. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
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  • It is perfectly true that the government is best which governs least. It is equally true that the government is best which provides most (Walter Lippmann)
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  • A government of laws, and not of men. (John Adams)
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  • Divide and rule. (Anonymous)
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  • The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. (Thomas Jefferson)
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  • The great task remaining before us … that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. (Abraham Lincoln)
  • Society in very state is a blessing, but government even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one. (Thomas Paine)
  • Government is not the solution to our problem. Government is the problem. (Ronald Reagan)

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